Quote

Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this son of York;
And all the clouds that low’r’d upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
” – Richard

Richard The Third Act 1, scene 1, 1–4


‘Tis almost morning, I would have thee gone—
And yet no farther than a wan-ton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from his hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silken thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.
” – Juliet

I would I were thy bird.” – Romeo

Sweet, so would I,
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow,
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.
[Exit above]” – Juliet

Romeo And Juliet Act 2, scene 2, 176–185


‘Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp’d tow’rs, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve,
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on; and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.
” – Prospero

The Tempest Act 4, scene 1, 148–158


O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.
” – Juliet

“[Aside] Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?” – Romeo

‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy:
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand nor foot,
Nor arm nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O be some other name!
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
and for thy name, which is no part of thee,
Take all myself.
” – Juliet

Romeo And Juliet Act 2, scene 2, 33–49


To sleep, perchance to dream-ay, there’s the rub.” – Hamlet

Hamlet (III, i, 65-68)


Swear by my sword
Never to speak of this that you have heard.
” – Hamlet

[Beneath] “Swear by his sword.” – Ghost

Well said, old mole, canst work i’ th’ earth so fast?
A worthy pioner! Once more remove, good friends.
” – Hamlet

O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!” – Horatio

And therefore as a stranger give it welcome.
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
” – Hamlet

Hamlet Act 1, scene 5, 159–167


To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
And by opposing end them. To die—to sleep,
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to: ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
To sleep, perchance to dream—ay, there’s the rub:
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause—there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life.
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
Th’oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of dispriz’d love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of th’unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovere’d country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pitch and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry
And lose the name of action.
” – Hamlet

Hamlet Act 3, scene 1, 55–87 [Italics mine]


All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages.” – Jaques

As You Like It Act 2, scene 7, 139–143


If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it; that surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die.” – Duke Orsino

Twelfth Night Act 1, scene 1, 1–3


Both here and hence pursue me lasting strife, If once I be a widow, ever I be a wife!” – Player Queen

‘Tis deeply sworn. Sweet, leave me here a while, My spirits grow dull, and fain I would beguile The tedious day with sleep.” – Player King

Sleep rock thy brain, And never come mischance between us twain!” – Player Queen

Madam, how like you this play?” – Hamlet

The lady doth protest too much, methinks.” – Queen

Hamlet Act 3, scene 2, 222–230


To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time; And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.” – Macbeth

Macbeth Act 5, scene 5, 19–28


What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” – Juliet

Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1-2)

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